Q and A: Hatebreed Talk Purpose, Pop, And The Pit

Hatebreed bring it hard, fast, and heavy with no excuses and no apologies. It’s a formula that’s built up an incredibly devoted worldwide fan base, which in turn has propelled the Connecticut outfit to the top of the metalcore heap. We caught up with frontman Jamey Jasta to chat about the band’s new album The Divinity of Purpose, the production process, and CNN’s erroneous categorization of the band this past summer that had fans up in arms.

OS: What does the title The Divinity of Purpose mean to the band?

Jamey Jasta: We just want to spark a new thought. It’s open to the listener and probably means something different to everyone in the band. Music and my family have been my purpose for a long time. I’ve had other purposes in life, but finding music and having my daughter were definitely divine experiences for me. So for me, finding a purpose is a major thing in life and I want this album to spark something in the listeners’ minds. (more…)

Scenesters Channel Their Inner Divas On 'Punk Goes Pop 5'

It’s that time of the year again: when people take words that others have said and twist them around to fit their own individual message. And no, we don’t mean election season; it’s time for another volume of Punk Goes Pop! In the fifth installment of the popular decade-old Fearless Records compilation, we get a mix of tunes from ’80s classics to contemporary chart-toppers. Here are five of our favorites from the upcoming November 6 release. (more…)

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

The Voice

Hannah Acfield

Most families keep a bowl of fruit on the dining table. Hannah Acfield’s kept one full of maracas, tin whistles, clap sticks, and harmonicas, which helps explain how the Melbourne artist ended up with a guitar in her arms years later. Acfield’s folk songs cover the stuff of ordinary life”the beginning of a new relationship, the end of a long one, and the little traumas that make us who we are. On the sublime This One Knows, the singer recalls the first blush of love with an acoustic guitar and warm, lilting vocals that show off her antipodean cadence. But don’t believe us”Gotye himself says that Acfield’s voice engages you instantly. This One Knows is summery melody steeped in nostalgia that’s best played while driving with the windows down. But not all memories are as warm. On My Tomorrow Acfield recounts a violent mugging, and produces a defiant folk rocker in the process. Tragedy and tambourines are strange bedfellows, but under Acfield’s artful guidance, everything’s in its right place.

Cameo Lovers: Kimbra To Collaborate With Ben Weinman Of The Dillinger Escape Plan

Yup, you read that correctly. Australian pop-star Kimbra (Known primarily across America as “the girl in that Gotye song”) has revealed in a recent interview that she will be collaborating with quite a few big names on her next album, the most obscure and intriguing being Ben Weinman, guitarist for math-core metal band The Dillinger Escape Plan.

The young and talented singer admits that DEP was “one of [her] favorite bands in high school. He was stoked, so yeah, it’s kind of awesome to be hitting up Benjamin Weinman and be like ˜put some guitars down on my new song.'” While surprising, the genre crossover here may not be as farfetched as one would initially think, seeing as both artists have very jazzy influences, and Dillinger has been known to dabble in pop music from time to time (i.e. a cover of Justin Timberlake’s “Like I Love You”).

Regardless, whether you’re a fan of Kimbra’s golden pipes and candy-coated pop songs or DEP’s blood-curdling screams and ruthless math-core carnage, this collaboration is sure to turn some heads. I’m sure with their “Good Intent,” and a “Two Way Street” of mutual musical appreciation, Kimbra and Weinman’s “Sugar Coated Sour” results just might be “The Perfect Design.” See what we did there?

 

More Like This:

Chart Catfight!: Look Who’s Hot on Carly Rae Jepsen's Tail in the Battle of the Pop Divas!

Carly Rae Jepsen is in luck. It looks like she won’t have to ensure the continuation of her celebrity run after Call Me Maybe falls from its current summit by relying on the hoopla generated by her own Nipplegate”nude photos that ended up being someone else’s.

Thanks to a call from Adam Young, the one-man band behind Owl City, Jepsen is about to relight the fire under her rising star the old-fashioned way: with a new hit. “Good Time,” her duet with Owl City, just debuted at No. 18 on Billboard’s Hot 100, which means that her breakout No. 1 single won’t forever be alone on her hit list.

It’s pop symbiosis at its most effective: He saves her from that pop purgatory known as one-hit wonderdom, where he had been languishing since 2009, when the Owl City single “Fireflies” hit No. 1 on the Hot 100, and she helps get him out of it. Sure Katy Perry could have accomplished the same thing in the middle of a dead sleep, but that hardly would have been a meeting of near-equals.

(more…)