Silent Party Readies New EP, Drops Second Single

London indie rock quartet Silent Party has been, well, if not silent, then relatively quiet over the past two years. The band has been working during that time, writing and gigging, but there have been no proper new releases. That’s changed now with the release of a new EP, including two singles so far. First was “Playing Small,” a pulsing, moody track with rapid-fire lyrics that somewhat evokes “The Boys Of Summer” with a bit of U2 guitar. Now comes “Offline,” a recording no less atmospheric, particularly in its restrained verse, but with a chorus that turns it into more of a dancefloor banger than “Playing Small.” Listen to both below, and follow @silentpartyldn.



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Video Of The Month: “Better” By Aüva

A little band emerged, as they are wont to do, from the cauldron of musical discontent known as Berklee College Of Music in Boston. They called themselves Sonia, but then regrouped and became Aüva, a now six-piece indie rock outfit who write real groovy and hook-filled pop songs. We’ve chosen their very first video, for the track “Better,” as our Video of the Month. It’s sweet and spacey, and harkens back to a golden age of Boston rock in the late ’80s, before the major labels came calling, when bands like fellow ex-Berklee kids Blake Babies were marrying classic pop sensibilities to clever, weaving, jangly guitar lines and longingly romantic lyrics. The interplay between the male and female lead vocals sends this one over the top, and the beautifully low-budget video wisely focuses on the band members and brings you into the song, rather than distracting from it. The video will be streaming on our homepage at OurStage.com and you can watch it below.

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Pre-order Late Cambrian’s New Album

Look, I think we’ve been very clear that New York’s Late Cambrian has been doing damn good things, so let’s get to the point. It’s been about three years since the release of their last full length, Golden Time, and since then, the band has morphed considerably from a catchy guitar rock band to a lean electro pop duo, who have released a series of carefully crafted singles and videos in the interim. Now, finally, Late Cambrian is readying the release of their new LP, Sweet Cambrian High, Vol. I & II. It’s available for pre-order now as part of a PledgeMusic campaign, and will be released on CD, cassette, and limited edition colored vinyl. So, if you like unique, infectious, and clever music – and we know you do – get to it now.

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Catching A “Matinee” With Reyna

Reyna, the band that evolved from songwriting sister duo Vic and Gab, have dropped a new single entitled “Matinee.” The blissed out indie pop jam is simultaneously a song of loss and hope, but heavy on the latter. It opens with a killer reverberating guitar riff and only gets better from there. Listen below.

“Matinee” sits atop a small pile of tremendous singles Reyna has released over the past year. The Milwaukee band recently opened for CHVRCHES in their hometown. We’ll let you know when they hit the road.

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Heidi Lynne Gluck’s New Single “Mercury Rising”

gluckThe multi-talented, multi-instrumentalist Heidi Lynne Gluck is best known to many as a utility player and session woman to the stars (including stints with Juliana Hatfield‘s Some Girls and Margot & the Nuclear So and Sos). But after a period of relative quiet, she’s spent the last couple of years focusing on her own material. In 2015, Gluck released her debut EP The Only Girl In The Room, a beautifully rootsy 5-song collection on which she was the sole performer.

In advance of her new full-length album Pony Show, due August 26th on Lotuspool Records, Gluck has released the single “Mercury Rising,” a rolling, melodic song with a vaguely “Man Who Sold The World” vibe that showcases her breezy, drawling voice and imagery rich lyrics. See below for Pony Show‘s full track listing.

Tracklisting
1. Pony Show
2. Mercury Rising
3. Sadness Is Psychedelic
4. Better Homes & Gardens
5. Waiting For You To Say It
6. Pin Striped Vest
7. I Like ‘Em Cruel
8. The Universe Had Split
9. Wolf
10. Jumping Vows

Review: Local Natives – 'Hummingbird'

Writing a sophomore album is a tricky prospect, especially when a band has received a massive amount of buzz and critical praise in relation to their relatively short lifespan. Groups crumble all the time under the weight of these expectations “ whether from themselves or from the media “ and often are unable to recapture the magic of their first major release: the one that they had their entire lives to conjure, instead of just a few months between tours and promotion. The rapid pace of the blogosphere has magnified the effect of this pressure, churning out new acts by the day that are effective sonic replacements for any formerly beloved group that has failed to pass muster on a new release. Add in the democratic and anonymous nature of the Internet, which emboldens the opinionated to release the type of caustic criticism that most would hide in person, and it is understandable why many bands today would have some trepidation regarding the release of new material.

Local Natives seem like they may be aware of, if not certainly reactive to, these perils. In part, because their second release Hummingbird does not stray far stylistically from Gorilla Manor, the debut album that put the Los Angeles group on the map in 2010. The band’s chiming guitar parts and multi-part harmonies remain, as do their intricate percussion lines that often form the focal points of their studio compositions and their energetic live shows. For some bands, the re-creation of a uniform sonic profile reminiscent of a past release could be interpreted as an insurance against loss, a way to satisfy those listeners who are expecting more of the same from a band they already enjoy. For other groups, the preservation of the same style could simply signify their love of that particular sound, and their desire to wring it dry for all of its latent value.

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