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Matt Bailie Launches Kickstarter

Matt BailieI always get really excited when I hear about an artist launching a Kickstarter. There’s nothing that quite compares to a fan’s dedication to their favorite artist, and Matt Bailie is about to prove that all over again. After all, he did take home the country prize for our 2010 Intel Superstars competition, and then emerge as the big winner of our 2011 OurStage Panel”there’s no doubt this artist has talent and a surging fan base to back him up.

With a dream to fund his sophomore release, I Wanna Live Like That, along with the music video for “Dress Down,” Bailie has launched a 30-day Kickstarter. Having worked with ACM and CMA award winning producer Darran Smith on the album, Bailie is seeking funds to cover the cost of everything from manufacturing to promotion, with the aim of getting the attention of industry giants CMT and GAC. Some of the pledge prizes include the new album, handwritten lyrics, recording session, cover video, and a full band house show. Check out the Kickstarter video below, and pledge right here to be a part of Bailie Nation. (more…)

Satellites and Sirens Launch Kickstarter, Offer Free Album Download

Satellites and SirensThere are a lot of reasons I have a burning desire to move to Nashville, not the least of which is the legendary music scene. In addition to the old school music business, and the attendant wealth of singer-songwriters, the city also boasts a history of cutting edge bands. Take for instance Satellites and Sirens. Citing influences like Jimmy Eat World, and 30 Seconds To Mars, these Nashville natives have perfected their craft well enough to earn themselves not only a sea of loyal fans, but a spot on the Rock Boat back in 2012, alongside acts such as NEEDTOBREATHE, and Bronze Radio Return.

But making music isn’t easy, and it definitely isn’t cheap, which is why the band has launched a 30-day Kickstarter to help fund their third full-length, One Noise. With a March 2014 release date, the band is offering some pretty cool prizes to help incentivize fans. Aside from the usual rewards of digital downloads, CDs, posters, etc., some of the more creative rewards include a phone call from the band, custom artwork on a guitar pedal, a Fender Telecaster, an in-home acoustic concert, or being flown out to be in the band’s next music video. You can check out their Kickstarter video below, and pledge here. The band is also currently giving away a copy of their last album, Frequency, which we highly recommend picking up. You can grab that here. (more…)

Chamberlin: "Maryland" Above The Valleys Part II

The members of Vermont’s Chamberlin haven’t just written an album about the difficult road back from betrayal and resentment. They’ve lived it. When founding members Mark Daly and Ethan West left for Nashville to write the band’s latest EP Look What I’ve Become, they took the Chamberlin name with them, informing bassist Chuck Whistler and drummer Jamie Heintz that they would not be playing on the EP. After recording the album, Daly and West realized the vital need to reconcile with their bandmates. Once they the band at their Vermont cabin, though, their keyboard player quit on the spot.

The second part of their Above The Valleys video series finds the rest of the group reunited at their Vermont cabin, describing their recovery from the setbacks that almost broke the band permanently.  Over the melancholy strains of Maryland, the fourth track from their EP, Whistler recalls being dropped from the group for the album’s recording: I didn’t even say anything. I was “ pissed isn’t even the right word “ I was pretty hurt¦It took a little bit of repair to get back to where we were. Despite encountering the type of obstacles that would have derailed a less devoted band, the group looks like they have never been better. Every once in a while, West says, people bounce back stronger.

Look What I’ve Become is out now on iTunes! Catch Chamberlin on a lengthy US tour this fall, and be on the lookout for an upcoming Songs of the Revolution session with them right here on OurStage.

Riffs, Rants and Rumors: The Sufis Serve Up Some Southern Psych

You don’t have to be stoned to be psychedelic. Sure, people tend to tag psychedelia as trippy, but that appellation has as much to do with the transporting quality of the best psychedelic music as it does with anything Timothy Leary ever espoused. After all, even Jimi Hendrix himself famously described the titular satori-like state described in Are You Experienced? as being not necessarily stoned, but beautiful. But if you’re after a more modern example, turn toward The Sufis, a young Nashville-based trio of psychedelic rockers whose driving force, Calvin LaPorte, observes, Bands who say they’re psychedelic but don’t really sound like they are, we encounter them all the time, and it’s pretty much guys who just smoke a lot of weed, and the music sounds better when you’re stoned. I think that’s what that kind of ‘psychedelic’ is, but we wanted to hone in more on the arrangement of psychedelic music.

Together with guitarist Jay Smith and drummer Evan Smith, multi-instrumentalist LaPorte pays homage to the swirling psych-pop sounds of the ˜60s on The Sufis’ self-titled debut album. And while his primary influences were making records before he was born, LaPorte comes by his inspirations naturally. He was first bitten by the paisley-patterned bug as a child, via his father’s record collection. I’ve been listening to that kind of stuff since I was six or seven, he recalls, The Beatles, I heard [Pink Floyd‘s Syd Barrett-fronted 1967 single] ˜See Emily Play’ really early on, seven or eight. And he [LaPorte’s father] had a lot of Beach Boys, that’s definitely one of the big influences. (more…)

Pumped Up Kicks

 

The Kicks

One normally doesn’t think of Lowe’s as an arbiter of music, but you gotta hand it to them”they nailed it when they placed The Kicks‘ Good Morning in their Fresh Cut Grass spot. The sailing power ballad is catchy to the extreme, burrowing down into your brain and setting up camp. As great as that track is, it isn’t the only ace up the Nashville band’s sleeve. The Kicks straddle pop and Southern rock spheres, taking big hooks and roughing them up with a little grit. Hawk Eyes is a ballsy little rocker that slips into a garage rock groove, deft as Jet. But unlike the erstwhile Aussie band, The Kicks take their rock all over the place. The soulful This Feeling reads like vintage R&B, while Sore Thumb has an almost ˜80s attitude. Like Lowe’s, these guys never stop improving.

Austin Renfroe Takes Home $10,000 Superstars Grand Prize

This is it folks, the moment you’ve all been waiting for. Thousands of potential superstars were narrowed down to just one lucky winner for the $10,000 “Superstars” Grand Prize. The artist? Drum roll, please. . .it’s none other than rising Nashville songwriter, Austin Renfroe. Renfroe landed the number two spot in the Intel® Superstars Competition Singer-Songwriter Channel with his track Taking Me Under, qualifying him for the finals round where he finished first out of 120 potential superstars potential. Now he’s $10,000 richer, which means he’s on the fast track to baller status (as if he wasn’t already, right?). Join us on congratulating Renfroe on his big win, and be on the lookout for our follow-up with him later this month.

 

Exclusive Q&A: MuteMath Revive Their Creativity

OurStage Exclusive InterviewsAfter a rough recording experience with 2009’s Armistice, New Orleans rockers MuteMath decided to reclaim creative control. The result is Odd Soul, a back-to-basics, bluesy record that speaks to the band’s live strengths, first and foremost. The album inspired the band’s upcoming Odd Soul Tour, which features breakthrough 3D video technology on top of stellar performances from both MuteMath and opening act Canon Blue. OurStage caught up with drummer Darren King to talk about how the band were able to revive their creativity, what gets him pumped up to perform and his goals for 2012.

OS: You had some difficulties with the making of [2009’s] Armistice, specifically with songwriting and working with a new producer. What did you learn from that experience and how did it influence your approach to recording this time around?

DK: I learned a little bit about not making things any more difficult than they need to be. I learned, through that process, the most valuable lesson I learned in my career so far. Of course, there are difficulties and parts of it that are frustrating, but you’re not supposed to hate music. You’re not supposed to hate the process. It’s fine if it’s a little arduous, a little frustrating, if you get stuck and get writer’s block…all of that’s good. But there’s always supposed to be this passion in it, it’s not supposed to be just this uphill climb, feat of strength just go get through it. From that point on, I vowed to make it fun. And whenever it gets gross, I start over again, in regards to songwriting, or the process of creating. You’re supposed to feel like you’re cheating at life by getting to do this for a living. And I try to present that, I try to fight for that now, and a big part of that, oddly enough, was not having a producer for this record, and it being just the three of us.

OS: Odd Soul is the first album you’ve made without original guitarist, Greg Hill. How did this change affectyour approach to the new album?

DK: Todd [Gummerman, guitarist] didn’t come into the picture until after the album was finished, so we had all of the guitarists that any band would ever need, and our bass player, Roy [Mitchell-Cárdenas]. [Roy] did a marvelous job of bringing all kinds of creativity and spark to the process to the process. I think he had a lot pent up in him too; he’s a talented guy.

He was a guitar player before he did anything else, so that was an easy transition. He stepped up, too. He’s a father of two, and both he and our lead singer were expecting children during the recording of this album. Roy would drive all the way from Miami to New Orleans, he’d drive through the night, and show up with a great attitude. It was really inspiring. And now we have our new guitarist. As we were finishing our songs in the studio, I would send them to him, and he would tell us that they were fun to play. He worked really hard to get ready for his audition. We were expecting to audition Todd in person, but he got to a place where he knew the songs well enough that he got tired of waiting for us, and he’d just email us his takes. He would play the songs, record himself, sing along, play along and he’d email it to me…and I thought that was ballsy! It made it easy; definitely our first audition via email!

OS: It’s rare to see a drummer that is so involved in the songwriting process. Does Mutemath have a certain method for how you write together?

DK: I think I’m more involved than you even know! Right now, I’m putting together our live video show and it’s time consuming, but I love it. This is probably the first time I’ve mentioned this…we’re doing a very exciting, 3D video show on this next tour. It’s been very tedious, but we’re working with some people in New York and some people in Nashville and we decided to try and go all in on this tour to make it big. So currently, my days are spent programming and animating video for this live show…it’s a new-found interest of mine.

OS: Odd Soul has a more blues-influenced sound than Armistice. What was the cause behind this shift in sound? Were there any particular artists that influenced you while writing this record?

DK: It’s so funny how the influences that I think I’m going for the most, don’t really seem to be the ones that come through in the end product. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing, either. But Roy’s playing opened up a lot of opportunities for us. All we were going for was something that would go great live. All the bluesy-ness didn’t so much come from us saying, “Let’s try to do something a little Jimi Hendrix-y,” or, “Let’s do some Led Zeppelin riffs.” It was really that we didn’t want to make a sleepy album. We didn’t want to make something that would be convoluted, live. We wanted to make something that would allow us to play to our strengths as a live band. The whole idea behind the record was to set up the tour that we’re about to do now. The big tour, with the video show and the lights and all of the antics. After Armistice, we released a live record, and I remember reading a review of it that said something like, “Why is this MuteMath’s best record? Why is their best record this live record?” And I thought, well, it probably makes sense that it is, to them. There’s probably some switch that we turn off when you go into the studio. Music can be a little like taxidermy. You can start replacing the real stuff with the glass eyeball and get real meticulous with making things seem real. And I think it has to be that way, to an extent, whenever you do music in the studio. So we tried to make [Odd Soul] sound more real.

OS: You’ve had your songs featured on the soundtracks for major motion pictures like Twilight and Transformers. How have these placements changed or impacted your fan base?

DK: Don’t forget The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2! Yeah, we did get some younger fans through Twilight, and I loved it. We got some hatred through Transformers. Some people loved it, but there were some hardcore Transformers fans that were livid that it wasn’t heavier, like…[metal growl]

OS: Before the new album dropped, Mutemath played some smaller clubs on the Odd Soul Introduction Tour. How will this upcoming tour be different from those shows?

DK: It will be longer. Right now, I’m not making any promises, but right now, the setlist we have has about twenty to twenty-two songs in it. We’ll have a great opening act in our friend Canon Blue, he’s out of Nashville, on Rumraket Records. He’s great. A great musician, great songwriter. We just decided, at this point, not to take out bands that we don’t like, but will sell tickets.

I’d just really rather not subject our fans to that anymore. Actually, we’ve done a pretty good job at taking out artists that I like. But we had a couple opportunities to tour with bands, and we’re gonna go for quality. We do want to make this the most absurd show we can and I want everyone to feel like they got way more than their money’s worth after the show, and I want to make it the best tour we’ve ever done. I’m certainly excited about this 3D video. We’ve got this really neat set behind us, and I think it’s technology that’s going to be pretty common in a year. I’m glad that we’re doing it now…I feel like we’re ahead of the game if we do this tour this way. If we did it next year, someone else will have done it before us.  I know [electronic musician] Amon Tobin has done crazy stuff with projecting on 3D structures…you see it a lot with electronic artists, but I don’t know a band that’s done it yet on a tour. So the goal, unless someone sneaks in there next week, we’ll be the first band to take that kind of stuff on the road.

OS: You mentioned Canon Blue earlier…what can people seeing him for the first time expect from his performance?

DK: He’s an electronic artist. He’s opened for Miike Snow, I think that was a really good fit. So, stylistically, fans of Miike Snow will also enjoy Canon Blue. He’s done a good job with mixing a lot of really beautiful elements with some intense, glitchy electronics, as well. I know he got the Amiina Quartet to play on his record, the same group that played for Sigur Rós. So he’s got a lot of pretty strings on his record, and he’s a good singer too…it’s going to be my favorite tour, I’m pretty positive of it. Unless something goes wrong! [laughs]

OS: You guys are known for having a pretty wild live show. What inspires your stage presence? Do you tendto be more consistent with the performance aspect of the set, or more spontaneous?

DK: I’ll only speak for myself, because I think the other guys would give you a different answer… but I’ll tell you what makes me wild on stage. I’m a little hungry for attention, and you certainly get it whenever you perform. People clap for you after every single song. I can’t think of anything else where I get that much attention. From the very first show we ever did, God, it got me really excited. I’m not an only child, but my brother and sister were both teenagers when I was born, and I was just alone a lot. I would spend hours in my bedroom playing drums, pretending there was an audience in front of me. Or I would put on my Paula Abdul record and dance as a background dancer and pretend there was an audience. I look back and realize that a very large portion of my time alone as a kid was pretending I was in front of a bunch of people.

I’d even do speeches. I memorized the Gettysburg Address and I would do it in my bedroom for, I guess, a bunch of soldiers? I was raised in church, and Paul did this too, he’d preach, his family would make him preach for people…and I would preach to no one in my room. That was just my thing, I guess…pretending I had an audience. And when I finally got one, I think I got way too excited. I just get pumped up. It’s exhilarating. And to be honest with you, I’m addicted to it. Sometimes I play hard because I love it. If I’m tired but I’m still playing hard, it’s because I don’t want it to end. I’m scared of the day when I don’t have an audience in front of me. I don’t like myself when I go too long without playing a show. I’ve gotten a little bit better about it, I think being married helps [laughs]. If one person approves of you after seeing you at your worst, then that does mean more than a bunch of people who think you’re cool whenever you’ve got a bunch of smoke and mirrors. I used to go through intense withdrawal, really bad, whenever we didn’t tour enough [laughs]. So yeah, it’s kind of an addiction thing. I get excited about people, I’m like a dog! [laughs]

OS: Since we just started a new year, what’s something you hope to accomplish this year that you haven’t done yet?

DK: Like my resolutions? My New Year’s resolutions are: to not sit down to pee, because I end up playing Words With Friends on my phone…just sitting on the toilet for too long. It’s just such a waste of time. Being on the toilet for five minutes after you’ve gone to the bathroom is just dumb. I’m also going to stretch daily. As a band, we’ve already made a couple music videos, we want to make another one. We get to go to Australia and we want to make a good impression there. And I want to be a good son, a good sibling, a good husband, a good drummer. OK, here’s the real one: to get into a creative habit with music. When we’re control freaks like this and we’re working on video and working on the tour so much, I’m starting to miss getting to make new songs. So just to do a little bit every day, with songwriting, so it doesn’t take too long to come out with the next record.

This is definitely a show you don’t want to miss! Catch MuteMath’s Odd Soul Tour on these dates:

01/26 Houston, TX at House of Blues
01/27 Austin, TX at Stubb’s
01/28 Dallas, TX at House of Blues
01/29 Tulsa, OK at Cain’s Ballroom
01/31 Denver, CO at Gothic Theatre
02/02 Los Angeles, CA at Club Nokia Live
02/03 San Diego, CA at 4th and B Concert Theater
02/07 San Francisco, CA at The Regency Ballroom
02/08 Sacramento, CA at Ace of Spades
02/10 Seattle, WA at Showbox SoDo
02/11 Spokane, WA at Knitting Factory
02/12 Boise, ID at Knitting Factory
02/14 Salt Lake City, UT at Club Sound
02/16 Kansas City, MO at Beaumont Club
02/17 Chicago, IL at House of Blues
02/18 Minneapolis, MN at First Avenue
02/28 St. Louis, MO at The Pageant
03/01 Grand Rapids, MI at The Intersection
03/02 Detroit, MI at St. Andrew’s Hall
03/03 Columbus, OH at Newport Music Hall
03/04 Cleveland, OH at House of Blues
03/07 Boston, MA at House of Blues
03/08 New York, NY at Best Buy Theater
03/09 Philadelphia, PA at Trocadero
03/10 Washington D.C. at 9:30 Club
03/11 Norfolk, VA at The Norva
03/14 Charlotte, NC at Amos’ Southend
03/16 Ft. Lauderdale, FL at Revolution
03/17 Orlando, FL at House of Blues
03/18 Atlanta, GA at The Tabernacle

Suzi Oravec Rocks Out As The Opening Act For Hot Chelle Rae's Hometown Show

Back in October, we invited all pop and rock artists to submit their songs in the hopes of opening for Hot Chelle Rae, and we asked everyone to judge. Singer-songwriter Suzi Oravec, who calls Nashville home (just like Hot Chelle Rae), came out victorious in the Hot Chelle Rae Opening Act Competition which means she got to take part in 107.5 The River’s Acoustic Christmas 11 concert alongside Demi Lovato, Colbie Caillat and the one, the only, Hot Chelle Rae. Curious what went down as Suzi warmed up for group that the American Music Awards named Favorite New Artist? Check out the video below!

The Power of Love

Austin Renfroe

Austin Renfroe does something not every singer-songwriter can do”he can make the masses dance. Command an arena. Maybe even blow an amp. The Atlanta native’s songcraft brings together folk, soul, pop and rock, cranks the volume up and unleashes the hooks. Buckle up and blast off with Honesty, a kinetic, chunky rocker that belongs somewhere between Maroon 5 and Gavin DeGraw. Taking Me Under is technically a love song, but one that’s got some muscle. If it was up to me I’d never have to choose between the pleasure and the pain / Cause once you’re in you’re never out again, Renfroe sings over a big, piano-driven surge. Powerful stuff, but if you’re looking for a quieter expression of feelings, skip to Can’t Bring Us Down, a striped acoustic ballad that showcases the singer’s limber vocals. Just don’t fall too fast”once you’re into Renfroe, you’re never out again.

“Honesty” – Austin Renfroe

 

 

Your Country's Right Here: Thompson Square Stay Cool as Their Popularity Heats Up

Thompson Square really can’t help reliving their first kiss.
After all, their biggest hit to date is “Are You Gonna Kiss Me or Not,” inspired when the duo began dating and Shayna wondered if Keifer would ever go for the big moment. Of course with the excitement around the song comes expectations to see the duo recreate it which is likely one reason they did the lip lock earlier this month at the Country Music Association Awards, winning all kinds of awws from the audience and media.
“Keifer and I just don’t very well apart from each other,” said Shawna of her husband of twelve year s. “We [co-wrote] the song ‘Got You’ just talking about that, comparing how certain things have to have certain things to work.”

The partnership between this couple certainly is a sterling example of things that belong together. As they head toward the December 2 Academy of Country Music Awards with seven nominations, it’s clear that they are among the year’s hottest country break out acts. Not only did “Are You Gonna Kiss Me or Not” receive extensive radio airplay and all kinds of popular success”including  five consecutive weeks on the Country Digital Soundscan Chart”but it has sold more than 1.5 million downloads. Thompson Square is also the only duo to reach No. 1 on CMT’s Top 50 Artist Chart this year.
Although the two were solo performers when they met at a Nashville competition, their chemistry was such that they almost immediately bonded professionally and personally. Both had lifelong dreams of becoming country stars and were doing whatever possible to make those dreams reality.